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Hockey

By training your visual skills, you'll be able to:

Perceive the game better in its entirety: the puck, players, lines, goal and boards

Shoot more consistently, confidently and accurately

Remember the patterns and weaknesses of the opponent

Pass more crisply by better identifying teammates.

React to fast-moving shots and passes.

Train your visual skills to improve your performance.

  • Raise your game through increased awareness of the position, speed and direction of the puck and players as well as the location of lines,
    goal and boards.
  • Efficient visual memory skills help offensive players remember the defensive players’ weak sides.
  • By training your visual memory and recognition skills you will be better able to recognize other teammates, opponents and position of the
    puck as well as where opposing players
    position themselves on the ice.
  • By enhancing your depth perception you will increase your ability to judge the position
    of puck in relation to players and their
    positions on ice.
  • Enjoy a better and more accurate
    passing game.
  • Shoot with confidence and accuracy.
  • By training your reaction time, tracking and
    eye flexibility you can better anticipate the
    angles of passes.
  • Use all of the ice and all the players on
    the ice.
  • For goalies, visual tracking, eye flexibility, depth perception, reaction time and visual memory are key for recognizing and reacting to the speed, direction, and height of the puck. Goalies need to continuously monitor the position of offensive and defensive players while watching the puck.

Hockey Teams Using the VEPT

Hockey Vision Performance Testimonials

Dynamic Edge Sports Vision Training Centers

Karen Muncey, President and CEO of Dynamic Edge Sports Vision Training

Karen Muncey
President and CEO of Dynamic Edge Sports Vision Training

alt : Karen Muncey President and CEO of Dynamic Edge Sports Vision Training

I'm Karen Muncey, President and CEO of Dynamic Edge Sports Vision Training Centers in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

We have recently adopted the Vizual Edge Training sessions for use in the Center because they are the perfect compliment to our existing program. Our Dynamic Skills program trains skills such as eye-hand coordination, peripheral awareness, speed and span of recognition and concentration under stress, but we were missing the areas of eye muscle development to improve skills like depth perception and accommodation and convergence, which are so essential in sports.

Now we can offer our athletes a more complete training program and they're loving it.

Karen Muncey
President and CEO of Dynamic Edge Sports Vision Training


Hockey Sports Vision Articles

Research has been scant on correlation between officiating and visual performance; new study shows

Why standardized vision testing, training crucial for sports officials

by: Barry L. Seiller, MD, MBA
Ophthalmology Times (4/15/2014)

Most calls by officials require correct quality of visual information. A critical call might be the difference between winning and losing for a team. Other visually based studies performed on athletes—including tennis, volleyball, and baseball—have shown that superior athletes possess superior skills. Research has shown that these visual skills, besides eyesight, can be measured and trained.

Officials have similar visual demands as athletes. Therefore, officials should have visual skills comparable to athletes. An official needs not only to be physically fit but also visually fit.

There are many examples of officiating calls that require superb visual perception:

  • Both feet or one foot inbounds?
  • Ball on one side of the goalpost or through the center?
  • Spike hit the line?
  • A 130-mph serve in or out?
  • Player offside?
  • Baseball hit the yellow wall line or not?

Read More of Why standardized vision testing, training crucial for sports officials...

Facilities in Europe are incorporating sports vision to help athletes enhance the visual component

Vision performance services offer new area of expansion for ophthalmic practices

by: Dr. Barry L. Seiller, MBA
Ocular Surgery News (7/29/2013)

Athletes across the globe, whether professional, amateur or recreational, are embracing new technologies and training methods to boost their performance. But while they lift weights, train in wind tunnels, adhere to strict diets and spend countless hours perfecting techniques, they often overlook one crucial body component: their eyes.

Recent studies are definitive: Athletes with superior vision skills perform better on the playing field. Until recently, however, no quantitative, interactive programs existed in the world of vision training. A U.S.-based company, Vizual Edge, is working to revolutionize the vision training game. 

Read More of Vision performance services offer new area of expansion for ophthalmic practices...

Degrading the visual acuity of sport officials significantly impairs ability to make correct calls

The Effect Of Visual Acuity Degradation On The Visual Judgement Of Sport Officials

by: I. GOMEZ, F. SPANIOL, J. DAWES
Department of Kinesiology, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, TX (5/7/2013)

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of visual acuity degradation on the visual judgment of sport officials. Visual acuity was analyzed by a standard visual acuity wall chart.  Visual judgment was determined by a tennis ball line test where subjects have to determine if balls are classified as "in" or "out". 

RESULTS: A paired-samples t test was calculated to compare the mean pretest (normal vision) score to the mean posttest (degraded vision) score. The mean on the pretest was 25.73 (sd = 2.16), and the mean on the posttest was 16.91 (sd = 3.22). The results of the paired-samples t test determined a statistically significant difference between the pretest and posttest scores (t(21) = 2.69, p < .05). CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that degrading the visual acuity of sport officials significantly impairs their ability to make correct line calls.

Read More of The Effect Of Visual Acuity Degradation On The Visual Judgement Of Sport Officials...

Bachman has been training his eyes for the last six seasons

Eye-Training with Dallas Stars' Goaltender Richard Bachman

by: Kevin Woodley
InGoal Magazine (4/2/2012)

"I think it's so important. Everyone does dynamic warm ups and loosens up their muscles and for a golie it's huge to get your eyes going and involved in everything and focused and working on tracking," Bachman said. "I developed it into a routine I can rely on, so that come game day I already know exactly what I am going to do and it keeps it simple."

Read More of Eye-Training with Dallas Stars' Goaltender Richard Bachman...

Eye training helps NHL Goalie seek Stanley Cup

Dwayne Roloson

by: ALLAN MAKI
Globe and Mail Newspaper (3/6/2006)

Edmonton's usually bland Roli the Goalie has been dazzling throughout the playoffs But what he is cannot be undervalued or underappreciated, because Albert Dwayne Roloson is the consummate professional. He will do almost anything to improve his game, anything from stretching to lifting weights to positive imagery to eye exercises. Yes, eye exercises.

Read More of Dwayne Roloson ...

Vision training for athletes evolved from reading therapies developed decades ago to help children

A Little Flabby Around the Eyeballs

by: GRETCHEN REYNOLDS
New York Times (2/5/2006)

Vision training for athletes evolved from reading therapies developed decades ago to help children with learning disabilities and people with amblyopia ("lazy eye") concentrate and follow lines of text. Unlike exercises designed to strengthen eye muscles, reading therapy works to improve the eye-brain connection. Sports vision therapy takes it one step further. "It's about eye-hand-foot-body-brain coordination," says Dr. Barry Seiller, an ophthalmologist who is Brett Basanez's vision specialist and the director of the Visual Fitness Institute in Vernon Hills, Ill. "Maybe you foul off the ball a lot, or you have all the technical skills but somehow just can't put it together. You go into slumps. You fail in the clutch. All of that, to us, screams 'visual problems."'

Read More of A Little Flabby Around the Eyeballs...


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